Category Archives: Campaigns

Local and national campaigns

Branch Annual Report 2016

report

The annual report reflects the work undertaken by the branch January – December 2016. It is well worth a read – 2016

City Council Budget 2017-2018 Contact Information

budget-logo

If you are affected by the budget or have any questions relating to this, please telephone or e-mail the Convenor who covers your directorate.

City Director & Governance – Amber Robinson – Branch Secretary – mobile 07786 330404 email amber.robinson@stoke.gov.uk

Learning Services Section of Children & Families, Housing & Customer Services, Place Growth & Prosperity, School Support Staff – Brian Tomkinson – Convenor – mobile 07767 814284 email brian.tomkinson@stoke.gov.uk

Children & Families (apart from Learning Services), Finance, Public Health & Adult Social Care – Justin Ashton – Convenor – mobile 07880 966510 email justin.ashton@stoke.gov.uk

join-now

If you are not a member and wish to join, please contact us and we can talk through the benefits of membership and bring you a membership form.

Retired Members Conference Southport 2016

retired-members

The branch sent a delegate to the Unison National Retired Members’ Conference held in Southport during October 2016.

Their report covers:

  • Women’s SOG meeting
  • Social Care
  • Transport
  • Energy

all issues which affect pensioners locally and nationally – retired-members-conference-southport2016

Further information relevant to retired members can be found on the Unison national web site – https://www.unison.org.uk/about/what-we-do/fairness-equality/retired-members/

 

Hazards 2016 Conference – Report of Delegate

hazards-logoThe branch has once again sent a delegate to the Hazards Safety Conference held at Keele University 29-31 July 2016.

The theme of this year’s conference was “Building Resistance To Support Safety Reps” and included:

  • Use Brexit to improve and not erode health & safety protection for all workers.
  • Dealing With Risks
  • Hazards 2016 Pledges and Demands

Well worth a read – hazards-2016-delegate-report

 

 

Branch Newsletter June 2016

Chartists Banner

Information in this edition includes:

  • 175 Years of Chartism – Why The Vote Matters More Than Ever
  • TTIP Benefits – What Benefits!
  • Health & Safety Is Not A Dirty Word
  • What It’s Like To Be LGBT In The Workplace – One Member’s Experience

Well worth a read ………. June 2016

NJC Pay For 2016-2018 Settled

pay justice

Following a meeting of Local Government Representatives across Unison the union decided on Wednesday 27 April 2016 to accept the pay offer from the employers.

Head of Local Government Heather Wakefield said “Having talked to members in local government across England, Wales and Norther Ireland, we have decided that there are to be no further consultations and we have agreed to accept the employer’s pay offer for 2016/2018.”

In summary:

The offer is for a pay deal that would cover the two years from April 2016. Those on spinal points 18-49 would receive 1% in year one and the same again the following year. For the lowest paid (those on spinal points 6-17) this would mean a pay rise of between 6.6% and 1.01% for the first year and between 3.4% and 1.3% the second year.

However, as this authority pays the Living Wage, if your revised pay scale is still below this (£8.25 per hour) you will not see an increase in your actual pay.

The offer also includes a joint review of the NJC Pay spine and term-time working for school support staff.

Revised pay scales  – 2016-2018 pay scales

If you have any queries or concerns, please contact your Convenor for advice:

Children, Adult & Family Services – Justin Ashton – justin.ashton@stoke.gov.uk

Place & Schools Based Staff – Brian Tomkinson – brian.tomkinson@stoke.gov.uk

Public Health, Resources & Customer Services, City Director – Amber Robinson – amber.robinson@stoke.gov.uk

TTIP Benefits – What Benefits!

TTIP & Democracy

TTIP or the proposed Transatlantic Trade & Investment Partnership deal between the US and the EU continues to progress. There have so far been some thirteen rounds of talks, all behind closed doors between US and EU representatives to bring the proposals to fruition.

Many concerns still remain about this trade deal such as not protecting public services and in particular the NHS against full scale privatisation, erosion of consumer protections around food and environment and the opportunity under the investor dispute system for multinational corporations to sue governments where decisions made by governments may affect a company’s profits.

More recently a Freedom of Information request by pressure group Global Justice Now to the Department of Business Industry and Skills has brought to light that the trade deal is likely to have NO benefit to the UK.

The report by the London School of Economics commissioned in 2013 concluded the following.

  • There is little reason to think that an EU-US investment chapter will provide the UK with significant economic benefits.
  • There is little reason to think that an EU-US investment chapter will provide the UK with significant political benefits.
  • There is some reason to expect an EU-US investment chapter will impose meaningful economic costs on the UK. Based on Canada’s experience under NAFTA, we would expect an EU-US investment chapter to be regularly invoked by US investors against the UK for governmental actions that would normally not be challengeable under UK law.

[The Investment Chapter of TTIP is the part of the trade deal that covers investor protection.]

The response from BIS also revealed that no risk assessment had been carried out for the inclusion of investor protection in CETA – the free trade deal between Canada and EU that is even further down the process of approval than TTIP.

Its little wonder that the UK government don’t really want this broadcasting from the rooftops as it’s obviously damaging to their view that we should embrace TTIP lock, stock and barrel.

Rest assured Unison along with many other likeminded organisations and trade unions will continue to campaign and highlight the very real dangers that this new style trade deal will bring to everyday life for us all. Let’s face it, if the deal was so good you’d expect a well respected institution like the London School of Economics to champion its cause. Perhaps it’s not such a good thing after all.

To learn more about the dangers of TTIP go to www.nottip.org.uk and to read the article from The Independent newspaper on this latest development go to http://www.independent.co.uk/news/business/news/ttip-uk-government-only-did-one-assessment-of-trade-deal-and-found-it-had-lots-of-risks-and-no-a6999646.html

TTIP & Democracy